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How to Save Yourself From Scammers!0
By - Posted 4th July, 2015 at 9:53 pm

Scammers have been around for as long as Habbo has been open. If there’s ever an opportunity to snatch a few credits from other users, they’ll be waiting. And I think it’s fair to say that we’ve all been scammed at one point or another. Granted, most of us were scammed in our earlier days on Habbo when we didn’t know better and played games like Falling Furni and Cozzie Change in dodgy-looking rooms promising a 50c prize, but that doesn’t mean scammers aren’t still around today. So this guide is mostly for the newer users out there who don’t know how to spot the signs of a scammer yet, or for the older users who want to refresh their memory.

Here are some points to think about before starting a game:

Is it too good to be true?
WOW! This kind owner is offering 100c to the winner of the next round of Snake! Very occasionally this really is the case, but be wary here as often the owner has just promised a huge prize to encourage people to p2p, rev, auto, or buy FP*. At best,they might offer a small prize (let’s say 5c at most) to the winner,but at worst they’ll either leave or kick the winner- and anyone complainers- from the room.

Keep an eye for p2p (etc.)
First of all, check that the game is skills-based rather than luck-based (this means the player must win due to their skill at the game rather than any randomising items such as fridges, holodice, etc.). If the game is luck-based, the host should not be accepting payment throughout the game as Habbo counts this as gambling, which is against the rules. Although this may not technically be the host scamming you, don’t play a luck-based game that accepts p2p as the host may suddenly be banned, tradelocked or muted!
The game may be skills-based, but that doesn’t suddenly guarantee that you’re safe to play. A scammer will always be accepting p2p (but not everyone accepting p2p is a scammer, remember) as they must be making a profit in order to be a real scammer. I would recommend never paying the host to take part/stay in a game. If you lose, just find another room. What’s the point in paying anyway? If you haven’t paid anything, the worst thing that can happen is that you make no wins or losses. If you’ve paid credits and then get kicked when you win, you’ve lost out. This is probably the most important point as you can’t truly be scammed unless you’ve paid money first.

Watch a game first
If you’re feeling suspicious, sit out on the first game and just watch. Make sure to keep your eye on the winner at the end and see what happens. Do they suddenly disappear? Do they thank the host and then exit to join the game again? Remember that this is not always a sure-fire way of avoiding being scammed as some hosts are using side accounts to “win” (either by pretending to keep p2ping or because it’s biased in their favour) but it’s usually fairly easy to see if they’re using a side account. Was the winner any good at the game? Did they keep p2ping every time they lost? Do they ever type at the same time as the host?

Fansites!
I should point out here that these tips don’t tend to apply to fansites. Although I’m sure some fansites (not official ones, obviously) have been known to scam occasionally, any official fansite’s events hosts will never scam. If they leave the room suddenly it’s more likely that they’ve disconnected than they’re running away. The main reason you can normally tell a fansite isn’t scamming is because the events shouldn’t accept p2p, regardless of the type of game. Similarly, prizes can sometimes be very expensive but this is normally because they are trying to get new users to sign up to their fansite rather than because they’re planning on running off with your money somehow. So fansites are normally a safe bet, but it always pays to be wary even if you’re pretty sure that something isn’t a scam.

So, to sum up:
-Never pay the host to join/stay in a game. It’s NEVER worth it even if there is a real prize at the end.
-Watch the winner- did they legitimately win the game?
-Keep your eye on the prize: is it a realistic thing to be giving away?
-Stick to fansites you know and trust.

*These are all terms used when playing Habbo games where the user pays the owner to receive certain benefits. Here’s what they mean:
P2P = pay to play,where a user can pay the owner to join the game after it has started
REV = revenge,where a player can take “revenge” upon another player and they automatically lose (the losing player can rev back and so on, which is known as rev wars, something scammers take delight in and always hope for)
AUTO = automatically win, this is the most expensive choice as it means the user wins the entire game without having to play (much like rev, other users can auto afterwards and this can turn into auto wars, which benefits the owner even more than rev wars)
FP = fastpass, a player can buy this and so each time they want to line up for the game they are automatically bumped up to the front of the queue so they’re guaranteed a place in the game

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